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The Powerpoint Lecture Really is Dead

The Powerpoint Lecture Really is Dead

Grant Wiggins: offers persuasive evidence that the lecture that has been in place practically forever–even when jazzed up with Powerpoint slides–is no longer effective or relevant.  In case you need further proof,  he culled an impressive list of additional resources to back up his evidence.  Follow the link to see what he proposes as alternatives.

If we know courses that rely predominantly on lectures are irrelevant to the actual learning being sought, why do so many high school and college teachers still rely on lectures as the primary form of their lessons?

Here’s an excerpt from his analysis:

  • the lecture-dominated course runs completely counter to what we know about the importance of formative assessment, high-level questioning and discussion, differentiation, and attention to metacognition….
  • It is the most undifferentiated and unresponsive approach to teaching that is possible. The lecture is premised on the idea that each and every student will (or should) profit from one message, spoken one way, at one pace, using one method.
  • It assumes that understanding occurs through mere listening and reflecting quietly rather than through questioning, discussing and trying to use the learning.
  • Athletics, the arts, and professional training in business, law, medicine and engineering provide important and more modern educational counter-examples. If the goal is to help learners make meaning of and transfer content in the future, then they have to be coached in how to do so.
  • Excessive lecturing is boring and off-putting to HS students.

In case there is any doubt about where others stand on this subject, he provided this list of additional resources:

http://americanradioworks.publicradio.org/features/tomorrows-college/lectures/rethinking-teaching.html

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/01/is-the-lecture-dead/272578/

http://ideas.time.com/2012/10/02/why-lectures-are-ineffective/

https://vula.uct.ac.za/access/content/group/951be155-f1ea-4ed1-bdf2-0e0dfc55e6e0/Website/Resources/The%20use%20of%20lectures.pdf

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/07/anyone-still-listening-educators-consider-killing-the-lecture/

http://harvardmagazine.com/2012/03/twilight-of-the-lecture

http://chronicle.com/article/Lecture-Fail-/130085/

http://www.bucknell.edu/x80297.xml

https://www.dpmms.cam.ac.uk/~twk/Lecture.pdf

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2013/11/lectures-didnt-work-in-1350-and-they-still-dont-work-today/281514/

http://pac.iupac.org/publications/pac/pdf/1970/pdf/2201×0023.pdf

http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic38998.files/Bligh_Ch1_and_Ch3.pdf

http://www.iamse.org/artman/publish/article_459.shtml

http://www.sfgate.com/education/article/Some-academics-dismiss-appeal-value-of-lectures-3338136.php

http://thecalvariablog.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/educational-value-of-lectures.pdf

http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/ocsld/resources/20reasons.html

https://www.academia.edu/1210577/The_Lecture_as_a_Transmedial_Pedagogical_Form_A_Historical_Analysis

 

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